All Teaching Resources

Filter By

Results

  • Ford's Theatre Then Vs. Now: Why Is The Stage Slanted?

    Blog Post

    More than 150 years have passed since John T. Ford first opened his famous Ford’s Theatre. In the latest post on the blog, we explore the theatre’s raked stage—a commonplace design in Lincoln’s day, but one that modern actors and designers find unique.

    Meta info for Ford's Theatre Then Vs. Now: Why Is The Stage Slanted?

    • Topic:  Ford’s History
    • Type:  Readings
    • Grades:  6-8, 9-12
  • Ford's Theatre As A Site of Tragedy

    Blog Post

    Professor of Geography at the University of Connecticut Kenneth Foote, and author of Shadowed Ground, discusses the context of places that have been involved in tragedies.

    Meta info for Ford's Theatre As A Site of Tragedy

    • Topic:  Ford’s History, Memorialization
    • Type:  Readings
    • Grades:  9-12
  • How Time Changes Tragedy

    Blog Post

    Kenneth Foote, Professor of Geography at the University of Connecticut and author of Shadowed Ground, discusses the context of places that have been involved in tragedies like the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001.

    Meta info for How Time Changes Tragedy

    • Topic:  Memorialization
    • Type:  Readings
    • Grades:  9-12
  • Bringing Podcasting to the Classroom

    Blog Post

    Ford’s Theatre Teacher-in-Residence Dave McIntire discusses how to use podcasting as a teaching tool for middle school students’ public speaking.

    Meta info for Bringing Podcasting to the Classroom

    • Topic:  Oratory
    • Type:  How-Tos
  • Lincoln and the Petersen House: How Their Histories Intertwined Before April 1865

    Blog Post

    In the years leading up to April 1865, William and Anna Petersen, both German immigrants, owned and occupied the Petersen House. They raised 10 children on the second and third floors of the home, while opening the basement and first floors to strangers. April 14 changed their family forever.

    Meta info for Lincoln and the Petersen House: How Their Histories Intertwined Before April 1865

    • Topic:  Ford’s History, Abraham Lincoln
    • Type:  Readings
    • Grades:  6-8, 9-12
  • The Foes Go Toe-to-Toe (Again): Lincoln, Douglas and the Election of 1860

    Blog Post

    Lincoln and Stephen Douglas were opposites. Lincoln stood 6-feet 4-inches tall with a slightly shrill, resonant voice. Douglas was a projecting, powerful baritone who measured a mere 5-feet 4-inches. Read more about their 1860 political face-off.

    Meta info for The Foes Go Toe-to-Toe (Again): Lincoln, Douglas and the Election of 1860

    • Topic:  Abraham Lincoln
    • Type:  Readings
    • Grades:  6-8, 9-12
  • Clara Barton and the Lincoln Assassination

    Blog Post

    Learn how Clara Barton reacted to President Abraham Lincoln's assassination.

    Meta info for Clara Barton and the Lincoln Assassination

    • Topic:  Assassination, Civil War Washington
    • Type:  Readings
    • Grades:  6-8, 9-12
  • Cartes de Visite: Understanding the First Social Media Craze

    Blog Post

    Long before Snapchat and Instagram, cartes de visite (“CDVs”) were the latest trend in image-sharing social media. And, at the time, they were considered just as high tech as Snapchat and Instagram are today. Because of the popularity of cartes de visite in the 1860s, they remain a popular collector’s item today.

    Meta info for Cartes de Visite: Understanding the First Social Media Craze

    • Topic:  Abraham Lincoln
    • Type:  Readings
    • Grades:  6-8, 9-12
  • What If John Wilkes Booth Had Lived?

    Blog Post

    As President Abraham Lincoln’s funeral train wound its way through the northern United States in late April 1865, Americans learned that the two-week manhunt for Lincoln’s assassination abruptly ended when Sergeant Boston Corbett mortally wounded John Wilkes Booth on April 26.

    Meta info for What If John Wilkes Booth Had Lived?

    • Topic:  Assassination, John Wilkes Booth
    • Type:  Readings
    • Grades:  6-8, 9-12
  • Who Was Detective James McDevitt And What Did He Discover About Lincoln's Assassination?

    Blog Post

    Shortly after President Abraham Lincoln was carried to the Petersen boardinghouse on the night of April 14, 1865, rumors spread about a separate attack on Secretary of State William H. Seward. People began to bombard the Metropolitan Police Station with personal testimonies, spouting wild speculation as to the meaning. James McDevitt was on the case.

    Meta info for Who Was Detective James McDevitt And What Did He Discover About Lincoln's Assassination?

    • Topic:  Assassination, John Wilkes Booth, Civil War Washington
    • Type:  Readings
    • Grades:  6-8, 9-12