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  • Words Have Power

    Learning and Writing from Poems and Songs of Enslaved People.

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    • Type:  Lessons
    • Grades:  6-8
  • My Lord What a Night: Civic Responsibility

    Lesson

    Based on true events, My Lord What a Night imagines the friendship between Marian Anderson and Albert Einstein. It explores the unique moments where their lives may have intersected and how they could have affected one another. Both came from humble beginnings, worked hard to develop their natural talents, and both faced racially motivated adversity. This lesson looks at how their identities informed their civic engagement.

    Meta info for My Lord What a Night: Civic Responsibility

    • Topic:  Theatre Productions
    • Type:  Lessons
    • Grades:  6-8, 9-12
  • “Can You Hear Me Now?”Voices of Civil War Washington

    Activity for Students

    This self-contained student activity uses primary source documents to examine how people of different walks of life responded to two key events during the Civil War in Washington, D.C.: Congressional debates about enlisting Black Americans in the U.S. Army in 1863 and the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln in 1865.

    Meta info for “Can You Hear Me Now?”Voices of Civil War Washington

    • Topic:  Civil War Washington, Assassination
    • Type:  Student Activities
    • Grades:  6-8, 9-12
  • Civil War Washington Through the Eyes of Mary Henry

    History Video

    Explore the city of Washington, D.C. during the Civil War through the eyes of Mary Henry, a young woman who lived in the Smithsonian castle. This video includes primary source texts and images.

    Meta info for Civil War Washington Through the Eyes of Mary Henry

    • Topic:  Civil War Washington, Assassination
    • Type:  Videos
    • Grades:  6-8, 9-12
  • Did Everyone Cry at the Assassination of President Lincoln?

    Activity for Students

    This self-contained student activity uses first-person, primary-source documents to explore how differently people around the country responded to the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln.Each section can stand on its own. Teachers may choose to use the entire lesson or use one or more activities separately. They can but do not have to build upon one another.

    Meta info for Did Everyone Cry at the Assassination of President Lincoln?

    • Topic:  Assassination, Lincoln's Legacy, John Wilkes Booth
    • Type:  Student Activities
    • Grades:  6-8, 9-12
  • A Universal Classic: Arthur Miller's "Death of a Salesman"

    Blog Post

    Arthur Miller believed that there was only one humanity and that all people share common experiences, triumphs and tribulations. This article explores how Miller's classic Death of a Salesman exemplifies that ideal.

    Meta info for A Universal Classic: Arthur Miller's "Death of a Salesman"

    • Topic:  Theatre Productions
    • Type:  Readings, Production Resource
    • Grades:  6-8, 9-12
  • Courageous Testimonies of African-American (Colored) Witnesses During the Lincoln Assassination Trial

    Blog Post

    Did you know that African Americans testified during the trial of the Lincoln assassination conspirators? In one major instance, 10 former slaves spoke out candidly against their former owner, Dr. Samuel Mudd, revealing him to be far more malicious than his innocent country doctor persona suggested.

    Meta info for Courageous Testimonies of African-American (Colored) Witnesses During the Lincoln Assassination Trial

    • Topic:  Assassination
    • Type:  Readings
    • Grades:  6-8, 9-12
  • How to Use Washington, D.C., As A Classroom

    Blog Post

    Washington, D.C., offers numerous opportunities to get out of the classroom and experience history, particularly when studying the Civil War. While Ford’s Theatre receives a large amount of attention, many other sites with engaging stories can be found around the city—in neighborhoods and places easily accessible to students that they may pass by on a daily basis.

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    • Topic:  Civil War Washington
    • Type:  How-Tos