The Ford’s Theatre National Historic Site (Museum, Theatre, Petersen House and Aftermath Exhibits) will be closed on Friday, January 20, 2017.

“Remembering Lincoln” Website is now Award Winning!

3 Min. Read

We’re excited to share some great news. Our website Remembering Lincoln, which brings together primary sources with reactions to the Lincoln assassination for everyone to explore from anywhere, has won two awards! American Alliance of Museums On May 26, the American Alliance of Museums Media and Technology Committee presented Remembering Lincoln with the bronze Muse…

Clara Barton and the Lincoln Assassination

6 Min. Read

Editor’s Note: In this post, Amelia Grabowski, Education and Digital Outreach Specialist at the National Museum of Civil War Medicine and the Clara Barton Missing Soldiers Office Museum, shares insights about pages from the diary of Clara Barton. Learn more about the diary’s historical context below, and view the pages in our Remembering Lincoln collection.…

What If John Wilkes Booth Had Lived?

5 Min. Read

  As President Abraham Lincoln’s funeral train wound its way through the northern United States in late April 1865, Americans learned that the two-week manhunt for Lincoln’s assassination abruptly ended when Sergeant Boston Corbett mortally wounded John Wilkes Booth on April 26. As primary sources in our Remembering Lincoln digital collection show, Americans were divided…

Citizen Historians: Students Help Research Remembering Lincoln

5.5 Min. Read

Editor’s Note: Chris Lese, a teacher at Marquette University High School in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, recently worked with Ford’s Theatre to bring his students into local archives and upload responses to the Lincoln assassination to the Remembering Lincoln Digital Collection. Here, he shares his experiences. How do you help students become independent learners? One way is…

Remembering Lincoln as a Local and a Friend

Editor’s Note: The Museum of the Grand Prairie has participated in the Remembering Lincoln Digital Collection by contributing pieces from its own collections, and those of local Lincolniana collector Kent Tucker.  Located in Champaign County, Illinois, the museum is in one of the counties of the 8th Judicial Circuit, where Lincoln practiced law for 20…

The Man behind the Lincoln Funeral: George R. Harrington

Planning a funeral is a difficult task under normal circumstances. Planning the funeral of a recently assassinated U.S. president brings that task to another level of complexity. That responsibility fell to 50-year-old George R. Harrington, Assistant Secretary of the Treasury, after the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln on April 14, 1865, shocked Washington and the…

Mourning Lincoln Through Images

Editor’s Note: This month we take a look at primary sources from our Remembering Lincoln partners at the Abraham Lincoln Library and Museum at Lincoln Memorial University in Harrogate, Tennessee. The museum is proud to showcase some of its memorial Lincolniana, drawn from a collection that contains a wide array of materials including ribbons, pins,…

Seven Ways to Use Remembering Lincoln In the Classroom

Remembering Lincoln launched in March 2015 to bring a range of primary sources—letters, newspapers, diaries, mourning ribbons, photographs, lithographs, objects—that show how people in 1865 responded to the first-ever presidential assassination and death of Abraham Lincoln. Nine Teacher Representatives helped us develop the project, offering feedback and producing Teaching Modules that bring together sets of…