Growing Up Lincoln: War and Play in the White House

6 min. Read

Tad Lincoln’s toy sword can be seen on display at the Ford’s Theatre Museum. In this month’s Museum Feature, learn more about the Lincoln sons and their childhood in the White House. The story begins like this: In April 1861, artillery shells bombarded Fort Sumter, South Carolina. A few days later, the fort fell to…

Presidential Brass Knuckles: Lincoln Sneaks into Washington

5 min. Read

The fact that the Ford’s Theatre Museum has several weapons on display should not be surprising. After all, it’s a site where a presidential assassination took place. What is perhaps surprising is that some of the weapons aren’t associated with the “main event” for which Ford’s Theatre is famous: John Wilkes Booth’s successful plot …

Highlights from the Museum: The Almost Assassins

Life-size figures of John Wilkes Booth and assassination conspirators Lewis Powell and George Atzerodt, as well as some of their belongings, can be seen on display at the Ford’s Theatre Museum. In this month’s Museum post, learn more about Powell and Atzerodt. If all had gone according to plan, John Wilkes Booth and his accomplices…

Highlights from the Museum: Abraham Lincoln and the Technology of War

The Abraham Lincoln and the Technology of War exhibition is filled with insights about President Lincoln and the technological advancements of the 19th century. The exhibit’s curator, Stephen Wilson, tells us how the museum holds snapshots of history. Nearly 50 artifacts are featured demonstrating the improvements in weaponry, the telegraph, the railroad system and photography.…

The Power of Response: Letters and Words that Moved a Nation

5 min. Read

Following Matthew Shepard’s attack in 1998, complete strangers from all over the world, moved by the horrific circumstances of Matthew’s death, reached out to his parents, Judy and Dennis Shepard, to share their condolences, outrage, grief, love and support. Not Alone: The Power of Response pairs artist Jeff Sheng’s Where Matthew Lay Dying, a hauntingly beautiful composite photograph of the fence outside Laramie—taken from Matthew’s perspective—with a selection of the letters sent to the Shepard family in order to explore the themes of empathy, community response and personal responsibility.